Patagonia to launch ‘Worn Wear Tour’ in Europe

Outdoor apparel retailer Patagonia is to launch its sustainable initiative, which aims to encourage consumers to make their clothing last a lifetime through repairs, in Europe this spring. Named the ‘Euro Worn Wear Tour,’ the project will see the retailer make over 50 stops in five European countries which they will offer customers free repairs for broken zippers, buttons, rips, and more whilst teaching them at the same time how to make their own repairs in the future.

Patagonia to launch ‘Worn Wear Tour’ in Europe

The ‘Euro Worn Wear Tour’ is set to kick off simultaneously in the UK and Germany on April 15 before moving onto Italy and the Netherlands before ending in France on May 21. The tour will see the retailer stop and open mobile repair stands equipped with industrial sewing machines open to the public in a series of locations, such as retail stores, as well as sports events, universities and even farmers’ markets. Locations in the UK include the Keswick, George Fisher & Nurture Lakeland blogger-fest on April 15 and 16 as well as The Brokedown Palace at Spitalfields Market in London on April 28.

Patagonia to launch ‘Worn Wear Tour’ in Europe

“Extending the life of our garments is the single most important thing we can do to lower our impact on the planet,” said Patagonia CEO Rose Marcario on the initiative. “This simple act of extending the life of our garments through proper care and repair reduces the need to buy more over time — thereby avoiding the CO2 emissions, waste output, and water usage required to build it.” Patagonia first launched its Worn Wear program in 2013 in the USA as a way to encourage consumers to take better care of their outdoor gear by washing it and repairing it as needed. The program is said to be an extension of the company’s philosophy, and aims to keep clothing, regardless of the brand, in use for as long as possible.

Patagonia to launch ‘Worn Wear Tour’ in Europe

“We want to empower our customers to be owners, not just consumers,” stressed Marcario. “It’s a simple but critical message: keep your gear in action longer and take some pressure off our planet.”


 

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